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January 18, 2016

Growing food successfully at home

by Val Reynolds

Anyone who grows some of their own food will know that success is a moveable feast!

Two years ago my attempt at growing tomatoes outdoors was a failure. The garden is very windy and the ground just didn’t get warm enough for the plants to develop, so in 2015 tomatoes were indoors, link to the feature.

Two Ailsa Craig plants in the centre

Two Ailsa Craig plants in the centre

However growing indoors allows access to juicy morsels to unwanted creatures without the usual predators to control them. Always wanting to use natural deterrents I keep a pyrethrum based spray handy.  However disaster struck when I inadvertently used the wrong spray.

pelagonium

I had nurtured this pelargonium over the winter, now on its way to the great composter in the sky

What happened? I noticed a couple of little flies in the conservatory, the kind that lay eggs in the soil and the grubs eat the roots and the plants die. So I rushed around looking for the pyrethrum can, found it and sprayed assiduously all the plants and seedlings. To my absolute horror I realised I had used a weedkiller spray instead. I rushed around again, found the water spray and desperately watered.

Tagetes to go in the kitchen garden as a pest attractor, sadly has to go to the bin

Tagetes to go in the kitchen garden as a pest attractor, sadly has to go to the bin

To no avail, within 24 hours little brown spots had appeared on some of the leaves and over the next week everything was on the way out. There was nothing for it but to start again.

Broccoli and globe artichokes

Broccoli and globe artichokes, all doomed

I contacted Delfland Nurseries who raise organic vegetable plugs and they sent me basil, chilli, sweet peppers and squash replacements. I resowed tagetes, nigella and limnanthes to serve as companion plants. If you are keen to find out about using plants as decoys to insects like black fly and attract pollinators like bumblebees and overfills, have a look the guide provided on the Thompson & Morgan website, from which you will see basil is a good companion plant for tomatoes, as are chives and mint.

Companion plants in the vegetable garden, notice the seat!

Companion plants in the vegetable garden, notice the seat, essential for contemplation!

We grow a lot of companion plants every year and will do the same this year –  nasturtiums, a great space filler and colourful companion plants germinate without any help from us from last year’s seed!

Half the plugs Delfland grow are organic own vegetable plugs and each month you can choose a ‘selection pack’ of brassicas, salads, glasshouse or herbs and more. Here’s a link to the ordering options.

For those of you who find the planning of seed sowing and remembering to keep to the schedule a hassle, will find these plugs so useful when you have run out of space for early sowings or when you don’t want a whole packetful of plants from seed raising.

Delfland now have bedding and other plants for sale as well as ready-made hanging baskets and pots planted in various colour schemes – now that appeals to us!

This has to be one of the best websites we have found for gardeners who enjoy growing their own vegetables. Delfland provide really good quality plants and great service. Do have a look!

Val Reynolds, Editor

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